All the train-related emojis

Since these emoji are tiny on most devices, and since most people just type “train” and select something, and since many people are not too bothered about which one to use, they tend to get jumbled up.  But anyway, here is what they’re supposed to be used for:

Trains

🚈 Light Rail

  • Light Rail is the correct emoji for the Ottawa Line 1 LRT
  • U+1F688

🚂 Locomotive (steam train)

  • With the Wakefield steam train gone, the Canada Science & Technology Museum is the best place to see these, e.g. the Steam exhibition
  • U+1F682

🚆 generic train

  • This is the closest emoji for Ottawa’s Line 2 diesel trains
  • U+1F686

🚄 High-Speed Train

  • Does not apply to any train in Canada
  • U+1F684

🚅 Bullet Train

  • Does not apply to any train in Canada
  • Typically used for Shinkansen trains, but applies to any train with a “streamlined bullet nose”
  • U+1F685

🚝 Monorail

  • U+1F69D

🚇 Metro (subway)

  • U+1F687

🚞 Mountain Railway

  • U+1F69E

🚊 Tram

  • The difference between light rail and a tram is that a tram runs at street level in a city, often with stops beside the sidewalk.  May run in mixed traffic.  The original form of rail mass transit in cities.  In North America often called a streetcar or a trolley.
  • U+1F68A

🚟 Suspension Railway

  • It’s kind of odd that there is an emoji for this as suspension railways are very rare.  The handful of suspension railways includes Wuppertal in Germany & Shonan and Chiba in Japan.
  • U+1F69F

Rail Cars

🚃 Railway Car

  • It’s not really clear what kind of railway car this is.
  • The train emojis are not really designed to be assembled together.  Some face left, some face forward, and you can’t flip the direction.  So you can make a train going left like this 🚂🚃🚃🚃
    but you can’t really make a generic train with cars 🚆🚃🚃
    or a light rail train with engines on both ends 🚈🚃🚃🚈
    plus there’s no consistency between different designs for this emoji on whether the railway car has a pantograph (overhead connection to electrical wires) or not.
  • U+1F683

🚋 Tram Car

  • The tram emojis are not designed to be assembled together.  A tram ends up looking like 🚊🚋🚋.
  • It’s definitely an electric tram, with a pantograph (overhead connection to electrical wires).
  • U+1F68B

Train Stations

🚉 (Train) Station

  • It’s really more train platform than train station
  • U+1F689

Ⓜ️ Circled M

  • Commonly indicates a 🚇 Metro stop
  • U+24C2

Rails

🛤️ Railway Track

  • These are all pretty much terrible at a small size.  Microsoft’s looks more like a mountain than railway tracks (and appears to show the railway heading directly for the mountain).
  • They aren’t designed to be lined up, so they look weird side-by-side: 🛤️🛤️🛤️
  • U+1F6E4

Ottawa O-Train Specific

While it might seem like the red O emoji ⭕ is ideal for the O-Train, there are two issues:

  1. It’s actually called Heavy Large Circle, so for people using screen readers, it would probably sound like “Heavy Large Circle Train”, not “O-Train”.
  2. It has a specific meaning in a Japanese context: “an alternative to a [checkmark] in Japan for a something that is correct”.

Previously:
September 10, 2019 Ottawa LRT Stage 1 Line 1 in Emojis
April 12, 2015 iOS Travel emoji – railway vs tram

France iDTGV train and iDCAB taxi

France has not one but three high-speed train companies that share the same rails.  There’s the traditional TGV which you can book about 3 months in advance, the low-cost iDTGV which you can book up to 6 months in advance (but only runs on certain routes), and Ouigo, which you can book up to 9 months in advance but which departs from outside Paris and runs only along a single route.

(There’s also TGVpop, where it takes a certain number of votes before the train is confirmed to run and can be reserved.  Voting starts 2 weeks before the train would depart.)

Booking iDTGV

UPDATE 2017-03-17: SNCF has announced that it will discontinue iDTGV as a separate brand with separate booking.  See e.g. iDTGV brand to disappear.  ENDUPDATE

iDTGV can be booked from its own website or app, which has the advantage of offering seat selection, or through voyages-sncf, which I gather doesn’t.

It has two types of “zone”, basically a quiet one (iDZEN) and a family/louder one (iDZAP).  See http://www.idtgv.com/en/idservices/idzen-and-idzap  It also has two classes, but in my experience it’s not worth getting 1st class on French trains.

It sort-of works for booking outside of France (including a good English interface).  There are a number of issues though (and some outright bugs / website errors).

To make it work without a European credit card and French phone number:

  1. When creating an account or checking out, do not try to enter a cellphone number unless you have a French cellphone.  The form only accepts French numbers (of form e.g. 06 xx xx xx xx).  The cellphone number is optional, except…
  2. When going through the booking process, on the options page, do not select the iDCAB taxi option.  It will make the entry of a cellphone number at checkout mandatory (this is a bug in the system).
  3. If you have a non-European credit card, your first checkout will almost certainly fail with “rejected”.

iDTGV support says « les cartes étrangères, non Européenne sont bloquées par défaut sur notre site par mesure de sécurité » which translates roughly as “non-European cards are blocked by default on our site as a security measure”.

However, having done the initial transaction and gotten your card rejected, you can email or contact form them and ask them to unblock it.  Just send them the last four digits of your card, not your entire number.  Thanks to Seat 61 for the info about credit cards.

If that doesn’t work, try also calling your credit card company to see if they have blocked the card on their end too.  Sometimes transactions on European websites trigger North American credit card company blocks.

I had to both email iDTGV to get the card unblocked at the website end as well as phone my credit card company to get the card unblocked on the card end.  I had the credit card support stay on the line while I ran the transaction through, a practice I highly recommend as it saves you calling back if it’s still not working.

Be aware that the iDTGV website will silently time-out if you’re idle for a while.

Other bugs:

  • In the Details of My Order section of Print My Tickets (the summary page), the links under “You Can Still” mostly don’t work (they just point to the summary page).  Use the links under My Booking (upper left) instead.
  • If you’re booking in English in the iDTGV app, check the dates very carefully.  it looks to me like there is an off-by-one error (e.g. you have to enter January 1 in order to get January 2), probably due to the fact that the French calendar week starts on Monday and the US/Canadian/UK calendar starts on Sunday.

UPDATE 2016-04-11: It looks like iDTGV has joined a number of other apps in now only being available in the French iOS Apps Store, rather than being available e.g. in the Canadian store as it was previously.  As the easiest way to display your tickets is in the iDTGV app, this makes it less convenient.  If you have already downloaded the iDTGV app, it will continue to work.  ENDUPDATE

Booking iDCAB

iDCAB is a taxi-like service for travel to and from the train station.  It’s available for quite a few of the major stations in France.
iDCAB 10 Euros
You can add iDCAB to your iDTGV booking (on the website) without any problems AFTER you’ve booked and paid for your main train trip.  However (if you have a one-way ticket at least) it appears to only offer the option for a taxi on the departure end of the trip, not the arrival.

In the iDCAB interface you can enter an international number (e.g. +1 xxx xxx xxxx) although it’s anyone’s guess whether it actually gets recorded correctly in the system.

iDCAB is not currently available as an option in the iPhone app.

You can also book iDCAB as a stand-alone service at http://idcab.sncf.com/ (thanks to Jérémie Croyère, CTO of iDCAB for this info – @cpasbanal on Twitter).

On the SNCF site you’re supposed to be able to submit your train booking reference to get it to autoload your train stations, but I couldn’t get it to work with an iDTGV booking reference.

Unlike the interface at iDTGV, the SNCF interface won’t give you options for how early you want to arrive or estimate travel time to the station; you have to choose your pickup time yourself.  It also won’t let you specify the number of passengers (however this doesn’t really matter as it’s a flat price regardless, up to max 4 passengers).  The price on SNCF is also higher than on iDTGV.  The SNCF interface will tell you what car service is picking you up though.

Baggage Restrictions

Note that iDTGV has tighter baggage restrictions than the TGV:

You can take 2 pieces of luggage for free (details below).

If you take more than two pieces of luggage, you will have to pay an extra charge of €35 per piece of luggage (on the iDTGV website in “My travel options”), within the limit of 2 extra pieces of luggage per person.

If you did not pay this extra charge when you booked, the payment will cost you €45 on board.

The free pieces of luggage per person cannot exceed:
– two pieces of hand luggage (suitcases, rucksacks, travel bags) per traveller; or
– one hand luggage and an object per traveller (a children’s pushchair, a wheelchair, a bicycle with its wheels removed and placed together in a special protective cover of 1.20 x 0.90m maximum, a surfboard placed in a protective cover of 1.20m x 0.90m maximum, a pair of skis, a monoski or a snowboard, a bag containing a ‘small-sized’ domestic animal; or
– a piece of hand luggage per traveller and a piece of luggage of 50cm x 50cm x 50cm ; or
– a piece of hand luggage per traveller and a musical instrument.

For more details, check out the full page at Seat 61: www.seat61.com/idtgv.htm

iOS Travel emoji – railway vs tram

Apple iOS 8.3 adds many new emoji (these symbols are standardized by the Unicode Consortium, not by Apple).  It also has a new, much larger display (emoji keyboard) with clearer groupings.  But not quite clear enough.

Perhaps it’s because Apple has a giant suburban US campus, but some of their transportation emoji are difficult to distinguish (there is a whole separate issue, which is that you only get the tiny icon, instead of being able to tap-and-hold to get a much larger more detailed icon with a text explanation).

Here are most (but not all) of the selections

Travel Emoji - IMG_2152 - 12152

As you can see, two of the entries in the far-left column look almost identifical.  They are actually railway car and tram car.  Here they are at double size, with explanation and Twitter icons (apologies for my clumsy graphics editing skills).

Travel Emoji - railway tram Twitter - IMG_2152 - 12152

You can see good info, with the representations used in multiple different operating systems, at EmojiBase:

In short, if you want to tweet or text a RAILWAY CAR use the TOP icon.
If you want to tweet or text a TRAM CAR use the BOTTOM icon.

(In fairness to Apple, the Android emoji are much worse, rendering the railway car like a bus.)

French intercity first class isn’t

UPDATE 2013-07-02:

France has two kinds of intercity trains.  For shorter distances or smaller towns, or where the high-speed network hasn’t been built yet there are slower trains, the TER and Intercités trains.  (Still fast by North American standards.)  This post is about first class on these slower intercity trains.

For the slower trains, there are 1st and 2nd classes, but there is no point in getting 1st class.  (Disclaimer: At least for trips less than 2 hours, which is what I was taking.  I was on 8 trains in total, three different routes.)

France has also been building out a high-speed network, the TGV trains.  This connects major cities, across long distances, but is not complete yet.  You can see the current lines in blue on this official map or download a detailed PDF map (15MB).

UPDATE 2015-04-11: While the TGV does have a first-class service, it has many similar characteristics to the TER – mostly you’re paying for a bit more space.  There may not be a lounge, and there’s no food service.  ENDUPDATE

Canada has no high-speed rail, there is a single kind of intercity rail, VIA.

Here’s a handy comparison chart, between Canada’s VIA Business Class (used to be called VIA 1), and French TER/Intercités 1ère classe

[Extensive rewrite of above section.]  ENDUPDATE

feature Canada VIA Business Class France TER/Intercités 1ère classe
lounge yes no
assigned seating yes no
priority boarding yes no
dedicated car(s) yes no, usually half 1st, half 2nd
located for ease of detraining and/or boarding yes, usually front of train, or near entrance no
baggage area yes, large sometimes a tiny (2 bag) one
lots of room for mid-size bags above seat yes no, a purse or small bag at most
seats offer extra space, better materials yes no
free drinks yes no, no service at all
included meal and snacks yes no, no food whatsoever

In summary: French TER/Intercités 1st class is a more expensive version of 2nd class, I’m guessing mostly intended to separate business travelers from regular travelers. It is in no other way better than 2nd class. You end up walking along the train trying to find the first class car (or usually the first class part of a car, indicated by a 1 and an arrow), and then jamming yourself in, no different from second class.

Don’t get me wrong, the French TER/Intercités intercity trains are great.  Service is frequent and many towns and even villages have stations.  Almost all stations are in the town centre.  Just don’t bring a big bag (you will have a hard time even finding space for a carry-on rolling bag) and don’t bother with first class.  And buy any food and drink you may want before you get on the train.  If there are 3+ of you traveling together, you can try to get to the cars as soon as they announce the track, and look to see if the 4-person tables are available and go in and grab them.

UPDATE 2013-07-02: If you want to know more about the French train network see the complete page of maps from RFF (the rail infrastructure operator) as well as the list of projects.  (Linked to French pages as the English pages are out-of-date.)