Infinity War and The Wrath of Khan

SPOILERS

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is a movie about consequences.

Heroes usually have the luxury of avoiding consequences, as they go from episode to episode always succeeding. Star Trek II is quite explicitly about how Kirk has avoided consequences for his entire life, starting with him beating the Kobayashi Maru scenario at Starfleet Academy.

David: Lieutenant Saavik was right: You never have faced death.
Kirk: No, not like this. I haven’t faced death. I’ve cheated death. I’ve tricked my way out of death and – patted myself on the back for my ingenuity.

In Star Trek II the consequences all come at once, whether it is a long-forgotten enemy or a son.
And in the end, the ultimate consequence, the death of Spock.

Which, in usual Heroic fashion, turns out to be reversible in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.

James T. Kirk: [Looking up from the planet surface to see the remains of the Enterprise burning in the atmosphere] My God, Bones, what have I done?
Leonard McCoy: What you had to do, what you always do. Turned death into a fighting chance to live.

And Star Trek II and Star Trek III are about the dialogue between the needs of the many and the needs of the few, or the one.

Sarek: But at what cost? Your ship. Your son.
James T. Kirk: If I hadn’t tried, the cost would have been my soul.

Infinity War Part 1 is definitely also about consequences, as I have written in Infinity War Part 1 – a universe out of balance. Presumably Infinity War Part 2 will be about the search to undo what has been done in Part 1.

I have to say that Star Trek II & III are rather more elegantly and clearly about these philosophical questions and about the consequences of a lifetime of heroic actions, but these ideas nevertheless are in Infinity War and (presumably) will emerge in Part 2 as well.

What DS9 I watch, when I can watch any episode

I don’t normally have access to Netflix, but I sometimes visit people who have it.

In general I have always liked DS9 better than TNG, because it is darker and has more complex characters and more believable inter-character dynamics.  But I have to say when I tried to watch the first season again, they definitely didn’t hit their stride early.  A few seasons on though the show started working well.

5×02 The Ship – Wikipedia (spoilers)

This is good except it is odd that the destruction of the ship in orbit isn’t part of their discussions.  It doesn’t really make sense as a standalone episode; you have to know the entire Dominion storyline to understand the various Dominion characters.

5×10 Rapture – Wikipedia (spoilers)

I just like something about the idea of having to choose between visions and living your life.

5×06 Trials and Tribble-ations – Wikipedia (spoilers)

Fluff, but they do a really good job visually of fitting into the original series episode.

The obvious episode to watch would be 4×03 The Visitor, which is probably DS9’s best episode, an analogous episode to TNG 5×25 The Inner Light in that it’s not really a DS9 episode at all.

Previously:
August 6, 2016  What TNG I watch, when I can watch any episode

What TNG I watch, when I can watch any episode

I don’t normally have access to Netflix, but I sometimes visit people who have it.

I started watching Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) when it launched, and over the years I have seen every episode many times, despite not being a particular fan of it.

On reflection (and particularly compared to the reboot Star Trek Beyond movie), TNG does have certain strengths that I will cover in a separate blog post.

After several years of being away from TNG, here’s what I watched, in the order I watched, when I could choose any episode:

3×15 Yesterday’s Enterprise – Wikipedia (spoilers)

This is a combination of “what would TNG have been if it was an action show?” and fixing the rather awkward way that Tasha Yar left.  It works well on both fronts.  (Although TNG messed up its Yaredemption by bringing Denise Crosby back later in an improbable role.)

This episode really works best if you’ve watched at least all of season 1.

7×15 Lower Decks – Wikipedia (spoilers)

This is mostly a way to watch TNG without having the focus on the main characters.

There is a similar Voyager episode, 6×20 Good Shepherd.

4×15 First Contact – Wikipedia (spoilers)

This is a pretty light episode, I watched mainly because I remembered the aliens’ dilemma about what to do about contact.  I had forgotten it has one of TNG’s most awkward scenes, with Bebe Neuwirth as a xenophile nurse.

5×02 Darmok – Wikipedia (spoilers)

As pure science fiction, this is the strongest episode of the series.

It also works well because like many of the show’s best episodes, it’s almost entirely Picard alone off the ship.

5×25 The Inner Light – Wikipedia (spoilers)

This is the most touching episode of the series, but it’s not really TNG at all in any meaningful way, it’s a story that stands alone.

It also works well because like many of the show’s best episodes, it’s almost entirely Picard alone off the ship.