Ottawa LRT Stage 3 maps

As the Stage 3 plan is neither complete nor funded, there isn’t a lot of definitive detail.

In Stage 3 Ottawa may extend commuter rail west to Kanata and south to Barrhaven, both from the west side of Line 1 (the red line, also called the Confederation Line).

It may also extend rail to Quebec over the existing but currently unused Prince of Wales Bridge, although there is also a Gatineau proposal to create a west-end rail system in Quebec that would run across the Prince of Wales Bridge that is proposed to run across the Portage Bridge.

UPDATE 2019-07-12: Here is a high-resolution Stage 3 map

Stage 3 purple from Light-Rail-Transit-Project_Tech-Briefing_20190222_EN
from slide 109 of the Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Project: Technical Briefing – February 22, 2019 (PDF) – Stage 3 extensions to Kanata and Barrhaven in purple

Based on Stage 2 completing in 2025, we would expect Stage 3 to be completed in the 2030-2031 timeframe, assuming they can secure Stage 3 funding.

See below for details of
Kanata
and
Barrhaven
Stage 3 extensions.

Note that the extension across the Prince of Wales Bridge may be complicated by STO’s proposed rail plan that would run instead on the Portage Bridge.

END UPDATE

To some extent you can get a sense of the earlier Stage 3 vision from the transportation network in the 2013 Transportation Master Plan. (The Transportation Master Plan normally would have been updated in 2018, but the city wants to complete Stage 1 of the rail system first.)

This map was a vision for the future (roughly 2028-2031 timeframe). The actual network will depend on many different factors including funding and route optimisation. Red is rail (Light Rail Transit), blue is bus (Bus Rapid Transit).

TMP - Rapid Transit and Transit Priority Network - Ultimate Network - tmp_en

Above from [2013] Transportation Master Plan, page 123 in the full PDF document or separate map download Map 3 Rapid Transit and Transit Priority Network – Ultimate Network (PDF).

Stage 3 is still at least 5 years (2023) from being finalised and started, since Stage 2 has to complete first. Completion of Stage 3 would be something like 2028 at the earliest. (See updates below.)

UPDATE 2018-02-15: I would characterize the surface rail (tram) line running along Carling depicted in the map above as highly speculative. If implemented as a tram, sharing the roadway with cars, it would have the same reliability problems other North American streetcars have. (This type of tram with shared road space is common outside North America, and works well there due to a variety of factors including different road designs and slower vehicle speeds.) END UPDATE

UPDATE 2018-02-23: There has been a detailed announcement about Stage 2, including a new prospective map for Stage 3 and a new timeline.

Mayor Jim Watson tweeted

We are setting the stage for future expansion of 12km to Kanata-Stittsville [from Moodie Station] and Barrhaven. Additionally, the Baseline Station is protected for a future 10km extension to Barrhaven, and Bayview Station is protected for a 1.5km interprovincial rail link to Gatineau [over the Prince of Wales Bridge].

[Bracketed comments] and strikeout mine.

He tweeted a map with Stage 3 rail extensions in blue, but this is usually used for Bus Rapid Transit, so I have changed the extension colour to purple. The map is low-resolution to start with, but I increased the size a bit anyway. UPDATE 2018-02-24: The map is from slide 109 of the Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Project: Technical Briefing – February 22, 2019 (PDF) END 2018-02-24 UPDATE

[a low-resolution map was here, see top of post for high-resolution version]

Stage 3 is now at least six years (2025) away from being finalised and started, based on the new timeline for Stage 2. This would mean completion of Stage 3 in the 2030-2031 timeframe.

END 2018-02-23 UPDATE

Kanata (Line 1 West)

Ottawa’s east-west commuter rail Confederation Line (Line 1) is completely grade-separated, which means that it never intersects with car traffic. This is absolutely the correct design for a high-reliability commuter rail network. When extending the network into car-designed Kanata, however, it has the unusual result of a recommendation that part of the line be elevated. Any time you put rail under the ground or elevated above ground level it’s more expensive, but I guess there are a lot of highways for the Kanata extension to cross.

The website is ottawa.ca/kanataLRT

See below for the Kanata map.

Documents are available from the May 9, 2018 City Council:

There are also draft documents from August 2018 available from the kanataLRT webpage itself, but rather unusually they’re in DropBox, so caveat downloader:

UPDATE 2018-11-25: The final Environmental Project Report (EPR) is available, dated November 21, 2018 and is also stored in Dropbox:

END UPDATE

Kanata LRT Stage 3 Map

In the map below, the proposed corridor and station locations are shown, with elevated portions of the line in green, at-grade in blue, and underground in yellow.

Kanata Fig 8-1 LRT Alignment and Station Locations

Map from section 8-3, page 168 of the August 2018 Report Draft from DropBox.

Stations heading west and then south:

  • Moodie Station (planned for Stage 2)
  • March Station
  • Kanata Town Centre Station
  • Terry Fox Station
  • Didsbury Station
  • Campeau Station (line turns south after this station)
  • Palladium [stadium] Station
  • Maple Grove Station
  • Hazeldean Station

A clearer map, but without indication of the sections above and below ground
kanata_lrt_map_en
from Kanata Light Rail Transit Planning and Environmental Assessment Study – Notice of Completion of Transit Project Assessment Process

In the map above “LMSF” means Light Maintenance and Storage Facility.

The older diagram below from the earlier May 2018 report to City Council – Corridor Options (PDF) also shows the stations.

Kanata LRT Fig 4 Preferred Corridor

Barrhaven (Line 1 South)

Barrhaven is new addition to the LRT evaluations, although a rail line to Barrhaven was always envisioned as part of the Ultimate Network. The line would connect south from west Line 1 Stage 2 Baseline Station.

The website is ottawa.ca/barrhavenLRT

UPDATE 2019-10-14: There will be an open house on October 30, 2019 at 6pm at the Nepean Sportsplex – Barrhaven Light Rail Transit (Baseline Station to Barrhaven Town Centre) and Rail Grade-Separations Planning and Environmental Assessment Study.  END UPDATE

There is a document from Transportation Committee on October 3, 2018 (also see meeting Agenda):

Barrhaven LRT Stage 3 Maps

Barrhaven LRT Stage 3 map

Above from page 5 of the Statement of Work document. Note that this is a study corridor, it’s not a proposed or final alignment.

Newer map highlighting study area:
barrhaven_lrt_keymap_en
Above from https://ottawa.ca/barrhavenLRT

In the above map BRT (the blue line) means Bus Rapid Transit.

There was to have been an open house in June 2019 on Barrhaven Light Rail Transit (Baseline Station to Barrhaven Town Centre) and Rail Grade-Separations Planning and Environmental Assessment Study as part of the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP). The open house has been postponed.

Prince of Wales Bridge

You can see in the maps at the top of this blog post that there is a plan for OC Transpo’s commuter rail service to cross the Prince of Wales Bridge, but I don’t know any details. I don’t even know whether they would use Line 1 or just extend Line 2 northwards. I’m happy to add details if they are provided.

Addendum

These are very early days, so rely on the City of Ottawa for official word on the specific rail lines and stations for Stage 3 LRT.

Ottawa LRT Stage 2 maps

Ottawa’s commuter rail (light rail transit, LRT) gets a lot more complicated in Stage 2.

As a reminder, there are two lines:

  • Line 1, the red line, runs east-west.  It’s also called the Confederation Line.  It uses all-electric trains, running on dual tracks (i.e. separate tracks for each direction).
  • Line 2, the green line, runs north-south.  It’s also called the Trillium Line.  It will use diesel trains, and has segments of single track (meaning that trains have to wait in carefully-managed stops, in order to share the track in both directions).

Line 1 extends east to Trim Station, but on the west side it splits, with part heading west and part turning south.  Line 2 adds stations and continues south, but then takes a rather dramatic turn to the west at the end of line.

Stage 2 System Map

In terms of implementation, the project is separated into three separate parts for the east and west (Line 1) and south (Line 2) extensions.  You can see the planned system in this Stage 2 map, including a Line 1 extension that was added in the west to Moodie Station and the new west turning to Limebank Station at the end of Line 2.  Below map from Stage 2 – Where (Internet Archive copy).

2022 2024 2025 OTT_LRT_Stage2_FullMap_11x17_FEB_2019_Bil(I added the dates.)

Black circles with black text boxes are new stations, and the new segments are also shown as thinner.  On the green line (Line 2), two stations are added within the existing Stage 1 segment: Gladstone Station and Walkley Station.  Line 2 also gets an extension to the airport, but my understanding is that this is not a direct train; you have to change to an airport shuttle train at South Keys Station.

The timelines are notional, basically intended to show that one part can be delivered before another.  A general guideline would be a 2023-2025 for completion of the entire system, particularly given the delayed launch of Stage 1. Note that bus rapid transit (the remainder of the Transitway buses) is shown in grey.  (See update below for new timelines.)

UPDATE 2019-10-07: Also see Interactive Maps below.  END UPDATE

UPDATE 2019-12-05: Stage 2 LRT Information Sessions

December 5, 2019Confederation Line East Extension (Blair Station to Trim Station)
Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex-Orléans
1490 Youville Drive, Orléans

December 9, 2019Confederation Line West Extension (Dominion Station and Westboro Station)
Churchill Seniors Centre
345 Richmond Road

December 11, 2019Confederation Line West Extension (Iris Station to Baseline Station)
Ben Franklin Place
101 Centrepointe Drive

December 12, 2019Confederation Line West Extension (Queensview Station to Moodie Station)
Ron Kolbus Lakeside Centre
102 Greenview Avenue

See all of the information sessions at https://ottawa.ca/en/planning-development-and-construction/major-projects/stage-2-light-rail-transit-project/project-updates/stage-2-lrt-information-sessions

END UPDATE

UPDATE 2018-02-24: A detailed technical briefing including updated timelines, budget, and the selected private sector implementation groups will be presented a Committee of the Whole special meeting of Council on February 27, 2019 at 1pm.

The documents are available in the city’s SIRE agenda system.  There are two agenda items:

The report ACS2019-TSD-OTP-0001 Contract Award of Ottawa’s Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Projects and Related Matters (PDF) has nine appendices of which the most interesting for me was Appendix 5: Station Descriptions and Technical Overview (PDF) which includes renderings of all the new Line 1 and Line 2 stations.

There is a very-high-level summary in city news release City holds technical briefing on Stage 2 LRT and the Preferred Proponents.

Stage 2 is made up of two projects extending the Confederation and Trillium Lines totalling 44 kilometres of new rail and 24 new LRT stations.

The marquee information is:

  • total cost $4.66 billion
  • Trillium Line (Line 2, north-south) extension target completion 2022, including a complete shutdown from May 2020 until September 2022
  • Confederation Line (Line 1) East extension target completion 2024
  • Confederation Line (Line 1) West extension target completion 2025

Ottawa Stage 2 LRT Table 5 Updated Schedule
above from page 61 of Contract Award of Ottawa’s Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Projects and Related Matters (PDF)

The Trillium Line (Line 2) includes a completely separate Airport Link Line, a spur line from South Keys.  By completely separate I mean you have to change trains at South Keys, and in fact the Airport Line will run completely different trains – it will inherit the current Alstom Coradia LINT diesel trains, while as previously announced the main Line 2 trains will be new Stadler FLIRT diesel trains.

Trillium Line (Line 2) Vehicles
Figure 7 Stadler FLIRT and Airport Link Vehicles
above from page 55 of Contract Award of Ottawa’s Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Projects and Related Matters (PDF)

The Stage2LRT website has also been updated, although not particularly intuitively.

UPDATE 2019-12-11: The entire Stage 2 website (stage2lrt) now redirects to the City of Ottawa website.  This means a lot of sections and links from the Stage 2 website are now broken.  I will repair as many links as I can using the Internet Archive.

ENDUPDATE

There is a new News item (the same as on the city’s main website):

BUT this news item doesn’t link to the new Stage 2 LRT documentation, which can be found on the Resources page, specifically at the bottom of the resources page.  (If they’d wanted to make it any harder on to find, they could have put a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard.”  Kudos to Skyscraper Page forums for finding it for me.)

The technical briefing includes a much clearer Trillium Line (Line 2) train diagram.  Note that our FLIRT trains will have two sets of doors per car, not one set as in Figure 7 above.

Ottawa LRT Line 2 vehicles Stage-2-Light-Rail-Transit-Project_Tech-Briefing_20190222_EN
above from slide 83 of Stage 2 Light Rail Transit Project: Technical Briefing – February 22, 2019 (PDF)

END UPDATE

Line 2 Extends South, then West

The details of the plan to extend Line 2 west are available in the Trillium Line Extension Planning and Environmental Assessment (EA) Study – Addendum.

I’ll only look at the end of the line, which is a change to the original Stage 2 plan.

Here is Earl Armstrong / Bowesville Station and Park & Ride

Earl Armstrong and Bowesville Station park and ride

Earl Armstrong and Bowesville Station plus park and ride functional design

Above two images are from pp. 68-70 of the Trillium Extension EA Study Addendum document (PDF).

Here is the extension west to Limebank Station

Limebank Station - extension

Limebank Station - preliminary station functional design

Above two images are from pp. 93-99 of the Trillium Extension EA Study Addendum document (PDF).

Line 2 Stage 2 Train Sets

In Stage 2 the existing Line 2 trains will be replaced with the Stadler FLIRT (Fast Light Innovative Regional Train).  It is diesel powered but can be converted to electric.

LRT2_Boards_48x36_EN_May02_2018

Above from City secures funding to extend O-Train Trillium Line to the heart of Riverside South.

Website

The main website for Stage 2 is https://www.stage2lrt.ca/. Please refer to that website for official Stage 2 routes and station information.

UPDATE 2019-10-07: There is also a lot of information on the City of Ottawa website in the major projects section, including station renderings.  https://ottawa.ca/en/planning-development-and-construction/major-projects/stage-2-light-rail-transit-project  END UPDATE

UPDATE 2019-12-11: The entire Stage 2 website (stage2lrt) now redirects to the City of Ottawa website (see link above).  This means a lot of sections and links from the Stage 2 website are now broken.  I will repair as many links as I can using the Internet Archive.

ENDUPDATE

Interactive Maps

UPDATE 2019-10-07: There is an interactive map available on the City of Ottawa website.  You can zoom in to see details, as well as click on individual stations (red circles) to get more information.  Thanks to Mapping Ottawa’s LRT on The Map Room blog for this information.  END UPDATE

You can see Stage 2 track alignments in GeoOttawa.  Go to More layers… and select Rail Implementation Office at the very bottom (below Miscellaneous).  http://maps.ottawa.ca/geoottawa/  Note that GeoOttawa requires Flash.

Stage 3

Stage 3 may extend to Kanata, to Barrhaven, and possibly across the Prince of Wales bridge to Quebec.  Details are not finalised; I have done a separate blog post with Stage 3 maps.

STO bus changes after Ottawa LRT Stage 1

This post describes the planned changes to STO Ottawa downtown core routes, to be implemented sometime after the Stage 1 LRT goes into service.  (So don’t expect these STO routes on day 1 of LRT service, but sometime in mid to late 2019 sometime in 2020.)

For OC Transpo I’ll just give a quick summary about the downtown core, rather than documenting the huge number of changes to OC Transpo bus routes all over the city; their site can tell you what you need to know much better than I can.  See the planned 2019 system map for all the details.

The high level summary of the OC Transpo Stage 1 bus changes from a downtown core perspective is that all of the Transitway buses, like the workhorse 90 series, are gone from downtown, along with all of the direct-from-the-suburbs buses, and Albert and Slater are no longer primary OC Transpo bus routes through the downtown.  Everything moves to a hub model, with the rapid buses going to Tunney’s Pasture Station (west end), Hurdman Station (southbound buses), and Blair Station (east end).  You can see my post Ottawa LRT Stage 1 maps for a map of the new rapid system.

Queen of Buses

The major downtown OC Transpo change will be a focus around Parliament Station on Queen.  All the frequent local bus routes, the 6, 7, and 11, will have a route on Bank and Queen.  This may be interesting considering that Queen has just been narrowed, and Queen will still be open for regular car and truck traffic.  My understanding is this shift will precede the STO bus route changes.

OC Transpo 2019 downtown core detail inset

Above is an extract from the downtown core submap on the lower right of the main OC Transpo 2019 System Map.  The red circles are station entrances, the black squares with letters are station-adjacent bus stops.  Mackenzie King Station at the south of Rideau Centre goes from being a very busy Transitway station to only being visited by the 16 and the 19.  (It will become a very busy STO station as you will see below.)

SIDEBAR: If you like Ottawa transit history, the 6 and 7 echo the route of streetcar line B, and the 11 echoes the route of streetcar line S.  You can see the streetcar routes in a plate from the Greber report.  END SIDEBAR

I had actually thought that the local bus routes would go on Albert and Slater and end up at the south side of Rideau Centre at Mackenzie King Station, but this is not at all the case.  Slater will still be used but only for part of the route of the 17, 16, and 19.

However Albert and Slater will not go for long without substantial bus traffic, as it turns out the STO buses will move to travel deeper into the core, including along Albert and Slater to Mackenzie King Station.

STO Bus Like a Lyon

Lyon Station will be a minor loop for OC Transpo, with the 10, 16 and 17.

But Lyon will become a major rush hour weekday Ottawa-side hub for STO, which will move almost all of its buses off of Wellington in front of Parliament Hill and instead loop past Lyon including going east-west along Albert and Slater with a second hub for regular lines at Mackenzie King Station.  This is a dramatic change for the STO routes.

STO Ottawa 2020
above from Changements à la desserte de la STO au centre-ville d’Ottawa (après la mise en service de la Ligne de la Confédération)

For Ottawans living in Centretown used to heading to Wellington to get their STO bus, this is a significant change, with STO stops (the small blue dots in the above image) strung along Albert and Slater, with some on Lyon and Bank as well.  (I assume based on the dots that OC Transpo stops will basically turn into STO stops.)

The new stops should make it much more convenient to use the STO buses from Centretown, except before 9am.

Outside the Perimeter

There are two hassles for Ontario residents taking the STO bus:

  1. You can’t tap your Presto card to pay for a single ride.  STO will only accept monthly pass, U-PASS, DayPass, and an OC Transpo transfer.
  2. Before 9am, outside the “perimeter” (which is in Quebec near the river), you must have an STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card.

UPDATE 2019-07-24: For more and newer details on transfers to STO from OC Transpo and vice-versa, see Fares and valid fare payments (after the Confederation Line begins operation) or Tarification et validité des titres (après la mise en service de la Ligne de la Confédération).

END UPDATE

First what this means is that if you walk directly (rather than taking an OC Transpo bus) to an STO bus stop in Centretown, you either have to pay cash for your trip, or you need a pass.  (If you’re just going for a single STO trip, it’s almost worth stepping onto an OC Transpo bus first just to get a transfer.)

And second what this means is since you’re probably going to work before 9am, you also need the STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card.  Which costs $8 and must be renewed every year and is only available at 3 STO service points.  If you tap your Presto on STO before 9am the reader will flash yellow, which indicates a need for the STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card if you’re outside the “perimeter”.

UPDATE 2018-02-12: As of January 10, 2019 there is no longer a requirement for the STO – OC Transpo Smart Card.

As of Jan. 10, 2019, riders with an OC Transpo monthly pass no longer need to tap their STO-OC Transpo Smart Card when boarding STO buses.

The STO-OC Transpo Smart Card allowed riders to use their OC Transpo pass on STO routes before 9 am. Now, there are no restrictions for OC Transpo pass holders on STO.

END UPDATE

On the plus side in practice when the reader flashes yellow the bus driver always ignores it anyway.  Which is good because for one thing, there’s no way $8 possibly covers STO’s administrative cost of processing the card application every year, and for another thing going to get it takes extra time and hassle every year.  Plus it slows down bus boarding every day.

On top of which the actual STO procedure for Presto is ridiculous (so it’s kind of good that no one actually follows it).  It appears to be:

  • tap your Presto card (which must have either a pass or a transfer)
  • show the driver the back of your Presto card (every time)
  • if it’s before 9am the reader will flash yellow, so then
    • tap your STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card
    • show the driver the photo side of the STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card (every time you use it)

I honestly don’t know what the point of this sequence can possibly be, other than to paralyse STO bus boarding in Ottawa.

UPDATE 2018-02-15: Information about STO Perimeter Zone depicted below no longer applies now that the STO – OC Transpo smart card has been eliminated.  END UPDATE

Basically as far as I can tell the entire thing is designed assuming that before 9am you take an OC Transpo bus to the Perimeter Zone in Quebec, and then change to an STO bus.

Perimeter zone in red in above map from STO – OC Transpo Rider smart card specifically Perimeter of the downtown areas of the Hull sector and Ottawa.

But with Lyon Station as a rush hour weekday hub starting in 2019, the above model no longer seems valid.

There is a super-simple solution, which is to extend the Perimeter to cover the entire Ottawa downtown core that STO loops through.

And an even better solution would be just to have Presto totally compatible for use for single payments or passes, without an extra STO rush hour card.  And an even better solution than that would be to support tap payment with debit and credit cards and phones, along with tap passes that you could have on your phone or a card.

OC Transpo to Gatineau

There will still be OC Transpo buses to Gatineau, with their hub at Pimisi Station, but I never take these buses so I can’t say much about them.

UPDATE 2018-02-15: You can see these buses on the OC Transpo Ready for Rail downtown map.  END UPDATE

The Future

There is a proposal for a Quebec west-side train loop, with connections across Prince of Wales Bridge (which you might expect) and Alexandra Bridge (which you might not expect, and I don’t really understand how it would work unless you completely redo the car lanes).  I will write more about it in a later blog post.

Addendum

As always, check the STO website for official information about the new bus routes and when they will come into effect.

Ottawa LRT Stage 1 maps

Here’s what the Stage 1 commuter rail (light rail transit, LRT) network will look like when it launches on September 14, 2019.  This post focuses on the rail maps; there will also be lots of bus route changes.

Maps

Line 1, the Confederation Line, the red line, runs from Tunney’s Pasture Station in the west to Blair Station in the east.  It is an all-electric, dual-track line (i.e. separate tracks for each direction).

It makes for a pretty simple map, from the OC Transpo Ready4Rail – Where will it go page.

OttLRT Line 1 Stage 1 Line_map1

Lyon, Parliament and Rideau stations are underground.  The Gatineau bus connection shown at Pimisi Station indicates OC Transpo Gatineau-bound buses.  The STO bus connections aren’t shown (they will be mainly at Lyon Station).

Line 2, the Trillium Line, the green line, runs from Bayview Station in the north to Greenboro Station in the south.  It is a diesel line with some single tracking, which means trains have to wait at stopping points in order to share the single track in both directions.

It also makes for a pretty simple map, from the current OC Transpo Route 2 results page, PDF map option.

O-Train Route 2 map_carte_002

The lines have a single transfer point at Bayview Station.

I don’t know of a map that shows just Line 1 and Line 2 together for Stage 1.

Here is a Stage 1 map of just Line 1 and Line 2 together.

Stage 1 - Otrain_network_map
from OC Transpo Expanding O-Train service, specifically https://www.octranspo.com/images/files/ready4rail/Otrain_network_map.png

There is also a map (PNG) that shows all rapid routes, which includes the two train lines in red and green as well as buses in blue. Basically the blue is what remains of the workhorse Transitway / Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines in Stage 1. (Map from OC Transpo New service types page.)  You don’t see the downtown core buses on this map because they are a different service type, downtown buses are frequent and their routes would be in orange.

OC Transpo Rapid 2018_Network_R 200

Interactive Maps & Downloadable Data

You can see current and proposed station footprints and track alignments in GeoOttawa.  Go to More layers… and select Rail Implementation Office at the very bottom (below Miscellaneous).  http://maps.ottawa.ca/geoottawa/  Note that GeoOttawa requires Flash.

If you want the data for Line 1 including station alignments, as shape files, you can get it from the City of Ottawa Open Data site http://data.ottawa.ca/en/dataset/o-train-line-1

There is also open data for O-Train Stations and O-Train Tracks, including Google Earth KMZ format.  I don’t know whether this is just the north-south line (Line 2) or whether it includes the forthcoming Line 1.

Rollout

For more on the rollout of Stage 1 LRT and accompanying bus network changes, currently planned to start in September 2019, see Ottawa LRT Stage 1 rollout with multi-step transit network changes.

Websites

The main website for Stage 1 is https://www.ligneconfederationline.ca/

but there is also information at http://www.octranspo.com/ready4rail/

There is a completely separate website for Stage 2 https://www.stage2lrt.ca/ (I have covered Stage 2 in a separate blog post).

Addendum

In renaming and rebranding the lines there may be some confusion.  Previously O-Train referred just to the north-south train, now it is used for the entire system.  Also previously route 1 and route 2 were downtown core frequent buses.  Route 1 was changed to route 6, and route 2 basically ended up as two routes, the 11 and the 12.

The Stage 1 rail lines won’t change, but nevertheless always go to the OC Transpo website for the latest official information about routes.

See Also

September 10, 2019 Ottawa LRT Stage 1 Line 1 in Emojis